Types of Cleanroom

Cleanrooms are increasingly being applied across various industries to maintain clean production environments to meet the diverse needs of different sectors. This guide aims to provide you with a deeper understanding of the various types of cleanrooms, helping you make more informed decisions when selecting the appropriate cleanroom for your specific requirements.

Cleanroom

 

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2 Types of Cleanrooms

What is a cleanroom?

A cleanroom is a specially designed and controlled environment or area where air temperature, humidity, pressure, and pollutant concentration are regulated by specific equipment. This ensures that the air in the designated room or area meets certain standards. Cleanrooms are commonly used in industries such as healthcare, pharmaceuticals, electronics, food processing, and chemical laboratories.

 

Types of Cleanrooms

Types of Cleanrooms

 

Based on Cleanliness Classification:

ISO 1

ISO Class 1 is one of the highest cleanliness levels according to ISO 14644-1 standards. It signifies that there are no more than 10 particles per cubic meter of air. ISO Class 1 cleanrooms typically recommend air change rates of 500-750 times per hour, with a ceiling coverage of 80-100%. In an ISO Class 1 cleanroom, the concentration of particles, microorganisms, and other contaminants in the air is extremely low. Achieving such high cleanliness requires precise air filtration systems and strict control over airflow to maintain consistency and stability in cleanliness levels.

The design and operation of ISO Class 1 cleanrooms must adhere to stringent standards, including:

  1. Efficient Air Filtration Systems: ISO Class 1 cleanrooms are typically equipped with high-efficiency air filtration systems capable of effectively removing particles and pollutants from the air to maintain cleanliness.
  2. Precise Airflow Control: Airflow within the cleanroom must be precisely controlled to ensure consistency and stability in cleanliness levels. Advanced HVAC systems and airflow designs are commonly employed to achieve this.
  3. Rigorous Environmental Monitoring and Control: ISO Class 1 cleanrooms require advanced environmental monitoring equipment to continuously monitor air quality and take necessary actions to maintain cleanliness levels.
  4. Specialized Materials and Construction: Construction and finishing of cleanrooms must utilize specialized materials and techniques to ensure cleanliness. Non-particulate-generating materials are typically used, and measures are taken to prevent dust and static.

ISO Class 1 cleanrooms are commonly used in specialized environments and applications where stringent air quality requirements are essential, such as in semiconductor manufacturing, biopharmaceuticals, aerospace, and other high-tech industries.

 

ISO 2

ISO Class 2 cleanrooms, according to ISO 14644-1 standards, indicate that there are no more than 100 particles per cubic meter of air. The recommended air change rate is 500-750 times per hour, with a ceiling coverage of 80-100%. Cleanrooms of this classification are commonly used in production and laboratory environments where air quality requirements are high, particularly in fields such as semiconductor manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, and biosciences.

ISO 2

Key features of ISO Class 2 cleanrooms include:

High cleanliness requirements: ISO Class 2 cleanrooms demand minimal particle concentration in the air to ensure product quality and stability during production processes.

Precision air filtration systems: These cleanrooms are typically equipped with efficient air filtration systems capable of effectively removing particles and contaminants from the air.

Strict airflow control: ISO Class 2 cleanrooms require precise control of airflow to maintain consistency and stability in cleanliness levels.

Applications: ISO Class 2 cleanrooms find applications in various industries, including chip production in semiconductor manufacturing, drug manufacturing in pharmaceuticals, and laboratory environments in biosciences.

 

ISO 3

ISO Class 3 cleanrooms, also known as Class 1 cleanrooms, signify that there are no more than 1,000 particles per cubic meter of air. The recommended air change rate is 500-750 times per hour, with a ceiling coverage of 60-100%. Cleanrooms of this classification are commonly used in production and laboratory environments where air quality requirements are high, such as in semiconductor manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, and biosciences.

Key features of ISO Class 3 cleanrooms include:

High cleanliness requirements: ISO Class 3 cleanrooms demand minimal particle concentration in the air to ensure product quality and stability during production processes.

Precision air filtration systems: These cleanrooms are typically equipped with efficient air filtration systems capable of effectively removing particles and contaminants from the air.

Strict airflow control: ISO Class 3 cleanrooms require precise control of airflow to maintain consistency and stability in cleanliness levels.

Wide application: ISO Class 3 cleanrooms find applications in various industries, including chip production in semiconductor manufacturing, drug manufacturing in pharmaceuticals, and laboratory environments in biosciences.

Compliance with strict standards: The design and operation of ISO Class 3 cleanrooms must comply with ISO standards to ensure that air quality meets specified cleanliness levels.

ISO Class 3 cleanrooms play a crucial role in ensuring product quality and accuracy of experimental results, providing the necessary clean environment for high-precision and high-reliability production and experiments.

 

ISO 4

ISO Class 4 cleanrooms

ISO Class 4 cleanrooms, also referred to as Class 10 cleanrooms, indicate that there are no more than 10,000 particles per cubic meter of air. The recommended air change rate is 400-750 times per hour, with a ceiling coverage of 50-90%. Cleanrooms of this classification are typically used in production and laboratory environments where there are certain requirements for air quality, particularly in pharmaceuticals, biosciences, and medical device manufacturing fields.

Key features of ISO Class 4 cleanrooms include:

Moderate cleanliness requirements: ISO Class 4 cleanrooms require particle concentration in the air to be within a certain range, capable of meeting the requirements of general production and experiments, but may not be sufficient for some scenarios with higher demands.

Air filtration systems: Cleanrooms are usually equipped with effective air filtration systems to remove particles and contaminants from the air, maintaining relatively clean air.

Controlled airflow: ISO Class 4 cleanrooms require strict control of airflow to ensure consistency and stability in cleanliness levels.

Wide application: ISO Class 4 cleanrooms find applications in various industries, including drug manufacturing, laboratory environments in biosciences, and medical device manufacturing.

Compliance with standards: The design and operation of ISO Class 4 cleanrooms must comply with ISO standards to ensure that air quality meets specified cleanliness levels.

Although ISO Class 4 cleanrooms have lower cleanliness requirements compared to ISO Class 1 or ISO Class 2, they still provide relatively clean air environments for most product quality and experimental requirements in general production and laboratory environments.

 

ISO 5

ISO Class 5 cleanrooms, also known as Class 100 cleanrooms, indicate that there are no more than 100,000 particles per cubic meter of air. The recommended air change rate is 240-600 times per hour, with a ceiling coverage of 35-70%. Cleanrooms of this classification are commonly used in production and laboratory environments where higher cleanliness levels are required, particularly in pharmaceutical manufacturing, biosciences, and semiconductor manufacturing fields.

ISO 5 CLEANROOM

Here are the main features of ISO Class 5 cleanrooms:

Higher cleanliness requirements: ISO Class 5 cleanrooms require particle concentration in the air to be within a certain range to meet the higher cleanliness requirements for production and experiments.

Air filtration systems: These cleanrooms are equipped with effective air filtration systems to remove particles and contaminants from the air, ensuring that air quality meets ISO Class 5 standards.

Strict airflow control: ISO Class 5 cleanrooms require strict control of airflow to maintain consistency and stability in cleanliness levels.

Wide application: ISO Class 5 cleanrooms find applications in various industries, including drug manufacturing, laboratory environments in biosciences, and chip production in semiconductor manufacturing.

Compliance with standards: The design and operation of ISO Class 5 cleanrooms must comply with ISO standards to ensure that air quality meets specified cleanliness levels.

ISO Class 5 cleanrooms provide a relatively high level of cleanliness in the air environment and can meet the cleanliness requirements for most production and experiments, making them a common choice in many fields.

 

ISO 6

ISO Class 6 cleanrooms (Class 1000) indicate that there are no more than 1,000,000 particles per cubic meter of air. The recommended air change rate is 150-240 times per hour, with a ceiling coverage of 25-40%. ISO Class 6 cleanrooms are typically used in general production and laboratory environments, such as general industrial production and laboratory testing.

Here are the main features of ISO Class 6 cleanrooms:

General cleanliness requirements: ISO Class 6 cleanrooms have lower cleanliness requirements and are suitable for scenarios where cleanliness requirements are not particularly high.

Basic air filtration systems: Cleanrooms of this classification are usually equipped with basic air filtration systems to reduce particle content in the air.

ISO Class 6 cleanrooms

Airflow control: ISO Class 6 cleanrooms require control of airflow to maintain a certain level of cleanliness.

Common application scenarios: ISO Class 6 cleanrooms are suitable for general industrial production environments such as general manufacturing and assembly, as well as laboratory testing and general experimental research.

Compliance with standards: The design and operation of ISO Class 6 cleanrooms must comply with ISO standards to ensure compliance with the corresponding cleanliness levels.

 

ISO 7

ISO 7 Cleanrooms (Class 10,000) indicate that there are no more than 10,000,000 particles per cubic meter of air. The recommended air change rate is 60-150 times per hour, with a ceiling coverage of 15-25%. Cleanrooms of this classification are typically used in general production and laboratory environments, such as general industrial production and laboratory testing.

Here are the main features of ISO 7 Cleanrooms:

General cleanliness requirements: ISO 7 Cleanrooms have lower cleanliness requirements and are suitable for scenarios where cleanliness requirements are not particularly high.

Basic air filtration systems: Cleanrooms of this classification are usually equipped with basic air filtration systems to reduce the particle content in the air.

Airflow control: ISO 7 Cleanrooms require control of airflow to maintain a certain level of cleanliness.

Common application scenarios: ISO 7 Cleanrooms are suitable for general industrial production environments, such as general industrial manufacturing, assembly, as well as laboratory testing and general experimental research.

Compliance with standards: The design and operation of ISO 7 Cleanrooms must comply with ISO standards to ensure compliance with the corresponding cleanliness levels.

 

ISO 8

ISO 8 Cleanrooms, according to ISO 14644-1 standards, indicate that there are no more than 100,000,000 particles per cubic meter of air. Cleanrooms of this classification are typically used in general production and laboratory environments, such as general industrial production and laboratory testing.

Here are the main features of ISO 8 Cleanrooms:

General cleanliness requirements: ISO 8 Cleanrooms have lower cleanliness requirements and are suitable for scenarios where cleanliness requirements are not particularly high.

ISO 8 Cleanrooms

Basic air filtration systems: Cleanrooms of this classification are usually equipped with basic air filtration systems to reduce the particle content in the air.

Airflow control: ISO 8 Cleanrooms require control of airflow to maintain a certain level of cleanliness.

Common application scenarios: ISO 8 Cleanrooms are suitable for general industrial production environments, such as general industrial manufacturing, assembly, as well as laboratory testing and general experimental research.

Compliance with standards: The design and operation of ISO 8 Cleanrooms must comply with ISO standards to ensure compliance with the corresponding cleanliness levels.

 

ISO 9

ISO 9 Cleanrooms, according to ISO 14644-1 standards, indicate that there are no more than 1,000,000,000 particles per cubic meter of air. Cleanrooms of this classification are typically used in general production and laboratory environments, such as general industrial production and laboratory testing.

Here are the main features of ISO 9 Cleanrooms:

General cleanliness requirements: ISO 9 Cleanrooms have lower cleanliness requirements and are suitable for scenarios where cleanliness requirements are not particularly high.

Basic air filtration systems: Cleanrooms of this classification are usually equipped with basic air filtration systems to reduce the particle content in the air.

Airflow control: ISO 9 Cleanrooms require control of airflow to maintain a certain level of cleanliness.

Common application scenarios: ISO 9 Cleanrooms are suitable for general industrial production environments, such as general industrial manufacturing, assembly, as well as laboratory testing and general experimental research.

Compliance with standards: The design and operation of ISO 9 Cleanrooms must comply with ISO standards to ensure compliance with the corresponding cleanliness levels.

ISO 9 Cleanrooms are typically used in production and experimental environments where cleanliness requirements are not particularly high, providing relatively low levels of clean air to meet the needs of general industrial production and experimentation.

 

Classification by Application Field:

Classification by Application Field

Cleanrooms in the Medical Industry

Application Areas and Purposes:

Cleanrooms in the medical industry are primarily used in hospital operating rooms, clean wards, special isolation wards, etc., to ensure cleanliness and safety during surgeries and post-operative monitoring and recovery processes, preventing cross-infection, and providing a safe treatment environment for patients and healthcare workers.

 

Design Requirements:

Cleanliness: Cleanrooms in the medical industry need to achieve a higher level of cleanliness to ensure air quality in medical areas.

Microbial Concentration: It is necessary to strictly control the concentration of microbes in the air to prevent the spread of bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms in medical areas.

Airflow: Select appropriate airflow systems to ensure sufficient airflow and circulation in medical areas, preventing cross-infection.

Sealing: The cleanroom should have good sealing to prevent external air and contaminants from entering the medical area.

Equipment Configuration: Equipped with efficient filters, air circulation equipment, and air conditioning systems to ensure cleanliness, temperature, and humidity of the air in the medical area.

 

Cases Analysis

Case One:

Mayo Clinic Operating Room Cleanroom:

Mayo Clinic Operating Room Cleanroom

Mayo Clinic is one of the world’s renowned medical institutions, and its operating rooms utilize advanced purification technology. Equipped with high-efficiency air filters and advanced air conditioning systems, the cleanroom ensures that the air cleanliness in the operating room meets the highest standards required. These measures not only effectively control the concentration of microorganisms and particles in the air but also significantly reduce the risk of infections within the operating room, providing a safer and more reliable surgical environment for patients and healthcare professionals.

 

Case Two:

Johns Hopkins Hospital Clean Wards:

Johns Hopkins Hospital employs advanced air filtration and circulation systems in its wards. These systems efficiently filter particles and pollutants in the air, maintaining the cleanliness of the air within the wards. Through strict air quality monitoring and maintenance measures, the spread of viruses and infections has been successfully controlled, providing a safe treatment environment and ensuring robust support for patient care and recovery.

 

Best Practices

Strict Adherence to Standards and Regulations

When designing cleanrooms for the healthcare industry, strict adherence to relevant industry standards and regulations is essential. These standards and regulations include cleanliness levels, airflow patterns, equipment configurations, etc., ensuring the effectiveness and safety of the cleanroom.

 

Proper Equipment Configuration and Standardized Management Processes

Proper configuration of air filters, air conditioning systems, and air circulation systems is crucial to ensure the normal operation of cleanrooms. Additionally, scientific management processes and monitoring systems are necessary for quality testing and equipment maintenance on a regular basis. Timely detection and resolution of issues are vital to ensure the stable operation of cleanrooms.

Proper Equipment Configuration and Standardized Management Processes

Continuous Improvement and Optimization

The design of cleanrooms in the healthcare industry requires continuous improvement and optimization. This can be achieved through performance evaluations and technological innovations, introducing more advanced purification technologies and equipment to enhance purification efficiency and energy efficiency. Continuous improvement ensures the operational and safety standards of cleanrooms are constantly elevated to meet various medical needs.

 

Pharmaceutical Industry Cleanrooms

Applications and Purposes

Cleanrooms in the pharmaceutical industry are primarily used for drug production and drug research and development phases. These cleanrooms play a crucial role in drug production processes, such as raw material processing, drug formulation, packaging, filling, etc., mainly to ensure air cleanliness during production and prevent drug contamination.

 

Design Requirements

Cleanliness Level: Pharmaceutical industry cleanrooms need to achieve very high cleanliness levels, typically ISO 5 or higher, to ensure drug quality and safety.

Microorganisms: Controlling the concentration of microorganisms in the air is crucial. This is usually achieved through air filters and airflow to prevent microbial contamination.

Particles: In addition to controlling microbial concentrations, it’s also necessary to control particle concentrations in the air. Effective measures such as air filtration and airflow systems are required to prevent particles from affecting drug quality.

Sealing: Cleanrooms need to have good sealing to prevent pollutants from entering the air. This can be achieved using sealing materials, sealed doors, and windows.

 

Cases Analysis

Case One:

Pfizer Drug Production Cleanroom: Pfizer, one of the world’s leading pharmaceutical companies, extensively applies cleanroom technology in its drug production processes. Through strict cleanliness control and microbial monitoring systems, they successfully ensure air quality and drug quality during the production process.

 

Case Two:

Novartis Pharmaceutical Research Cleanroom: Novartis, a renowned pharmaceutical research company, extensively employs cleanroom technology in its research centers. Their cleanrooms are equipped with advanced air filters and air conditioning systems, ensuring a clean environment during the research process and accurate experimental results.

Novartis Pharmaceutical Research Cleanroom

Electronics Manufacturing Industry Cleanrooms

Applications and Purposes

Cleanrooms in the electronics manufacturing industry are primarily used for electronic manufacturing in sectors such as semiconductors and displays. They are usually located in critical production processes, such as chip manufacturing and semiconductor production, to ensure air cleanliness during production and prevent contamination from particles, microorganisms, etc.

 

Design Requirements

Cleanliness Level: Cleanrooms in the electronics manufacturing industry have extremely high cleanliness requirements, generally requiring ISO 6 or higher.

Particle Concentration: High-efficiency filters and suitable airflow systems are used to effectively control and reduce particle concentrations, preventing contamination during the production process.

Static Control: Static electricity generation is a common issue in electronics manufacturing processes. Therefore, cleanrooms need to be equipped with static elimination devices and anti-static flooring to reduce the impact of static electricity on products.

Temperature and Humidity Control: Since some electronic devices are sensitive to temperature and humidity, cleanrooms in the electronics manufacturing industry typically require air conditioning systems and temperature and humidity control systems to ensure a stable production environment and minimize the impact on product quality.

 

Cases Analysis

Case One:

Intel Chip Production Cleanroom: Intel, one of the world’s leading chip manufacturers, extensively employs advanced cleanroom technology in its chip production factories. Equipped with advanced air filters and air conditioning systems, they ensure a clean production environment and product quality.

Intel Chip Production Cleanroom

Case Two:

Samsung Display Device Production Cleanroom: Samsung, a globally renowned electronics manufacturer, employs advanced cleanroom technology in its display device production factories. The cleanrooms are equipped with high-efficiency air filters and static elimination devices, ensuring particle and static control during the production process and guaranteeing product quality and reliability.

 

Cleanrooms in the Food Processing Industry

Applications and Purposes

Cleanrooms in the food processing industry are primarily used in food production and processing areas, often in key processes such as food packaging, filling, bottling, etc. The main purpose is to prevent contaminants such as microorganisms in the air from affecting the quality and safety of food products.

 

Design Requirements

Cleanliness Level: Cleanrooms in the food processing industry typically require ISO 7 level cleanliness to ensure a high level of cleanliness and air quality during the production process.

Microorganisms: Controlling the concentration of microorganisms in the air is crucial for food processing and production. This is usually achieved through air filters and airflow systems to reduce microbial contamination and ensure food hygiene and safety.

Particles: By using air filters and airflow systems, the concentration of particles in the air is reduced to minimize their impact on food quality and safety.

Cleanroom Surfaces: The walls of cleanrooms in the food processing industry should be made of materials that are easy to clean and disinfect to ensure hygiene and safety in the production environment.

Cleanroom Surfaces

Cases Analysis

Case One:

Nestle Food Packaging Cleanroom: Nestle is a globally renowned food production and processing company. They extensively use advanced cleanroom technology in their food packaging production lines. Their cleanrooms are equipped with advanced air filters and air conditioning systems, ensuring a clean environment and product quality during the food packaging process.

 

Case Two:

Coca-Cola Beverage Bottling Cleanroom: Coca-Cola is a global leader in beverage production and processing. They employ high-level cleanroom technology in their beverage bottling production lines. Their cleanrooms are equipped with efficient air filters and microbial monitoring systems, ensuring air quality and product quality during the beverage bottling process.

 

Laboratory Cleanrooms

Applications and Purposes

Laboratory cleanrooms are primarily used in academic research institutions, medical facilities, biotechnology companies, and other research and experimentation fields. These cleanrooms are commonly utilized for experimental operations and sample handling, such as biological experiments, chemical experiments, etc. The main purpose is to prevent contaminants from affecting experimental results, ensuring the accuracy and reliability of experimental data.

Laboratory Cleanrooms

Design Requirements

Cleanliness Level: Laboratory cleanrooms typically need to achieve ISO 5 or higher levels to ensure air quality during experiments.

Microorganisms: By employing efficient filters and airflow systems, the concentration of microorganisms in the air is effectively controlled, reducing microbial contamination during experiments and ensuring accuracy.

Particles: Particle concentration also affects the accuracy and stability of experiments. Therefore, efficient filters and appropriate airflow systems are needed to maintain particle concentration within the required range.

Safety: The design of laboratory cleanrooms should consider the safety of experimental operations, including the provision of emergency equipment or explosion-proof devices.

 

Cases Analysis

Case One:

Harvard University Biological Laboratory Cleanroom: Harvard University’s biological laboratories extensively utilize cleanroom technology to ensure a clean environment and accurate experimental results. Their cleanrooms are equipped with advanced air filters and air conditioning systems, facilitating smooth experiments.

 

Case Two:

Pfizer Pharmaceutical Research Laboratory Cleanroom: Pfizer, a renowned pharmaceutical company, widely applies cleanroom technology in its research centers. Their laboratory cleanrooms are equipped with efficient air filters and microbial monitoring systems, ensuring a clean environment and accurate experimental results during the research and development process.

 

Industrial Production Cleanrooms

Applications and Purposes

Industrial production cleanrooms are widely used in various manufacturing environments, such as automobile manufacturing, aerospace, electronics manufacturing, and more. They are particularly essential in assembly and coating processes on production lines to ensure air quality during manufacturing and reduce the impact of pollutants on product quality.

Industrial Production Cleanrooms

Design Requirements

Cleanliness Level: Industrial production cleanrooms need to meet specific cleanliness levels, which may vary depending on the production environment and products.

Particles: Utilizing efficient filters and airflow systems helps control particle concentration in the air, thereby minimizing their impact on product quality.

Chemical Gases: Harmful chemical gases may be generated in some industrial production processes. Therefore, cleanrooms need to be equipped with gas purification equipment to effectively control the concentration of harmful gases in the air.

Antistatic Measures: Static electricity can be generated during electronic manufacturing and the production of precision instruments. Therefore, cleanrooms need to implement certain antistatic measures to reduce the impact of static electricity on product quality.

 

Cases Analysis

Case One:

Toyota Automobile Production Cleanroom: Toyota, one of the world’s renowned automobile manufacturers, extensively adopts cleanroom technology on its automobile production lines. Their cleanrooms are equipped with advanced air filters and air conditioning systems, ensuring a clean environment and product quality during automobile production.

 

Case Two:

Boeing Aerospace Manufacturing Cleanroom: Boeing, a global leader in aerospace manufacturing, applies cleanroom technology in its aircraft manufacturing factories. Their cleanrooms are equipped with efficient air filters and chemical gas purification equipment, ensuring a clean environment and product quality during aircraft production.

 

Classification by Space Size:

Classification by Space Size

 

Small-Scale Cleanrooms:

Small-scale cleanrooms typically refer to compact areas with lower cleanliness requirements, suitable for environments such as laboratories and medical clinics. These cleanrooms are often used for small-scale production of limited quantities of products or for small-scale experimental research.

 

Medium-Scale Cleanrooms:

Medium-scale cleanrooms refer to spaces of moderate size, suitable for medium-scale production or experimental activities. Commonly found in industries such as pharmaceutical manufacturing, electronics manufacturing, and food processing, they can meet the production needs of a certain scale.

 

Large-Scale Cleanrooms:

Large-scale cleanrooms are spacious areas used for large-scale production activities, such as in large pharmaceutical factories, electronics plants, and semiconductor factories. Equipped with advanced air treatment equipment and stringent cleanliness control systems, these cleanrooms ensure cleanliness and product quality during the production process.

 

Extra-Large Cleanrooms:

Extra-large cleanrooms are extremely spacious areas commonly found in special industries or fields such as aerospace and healthcare. These cleanrooms typically have very high cleanliness requirements and complex air treatment systems to meet the demands of special production or experimental needs.

 

Classification by Function:

Classification by Function

Production Type:

These cleanrooms are primarily used in production environments, such as pharmaceutical manufacturing, electronics manufacturing, and food processing. Their main function is to provide a clean working environment for production processes, ensuring product quality and safety.

 

Laboratory Type:

Laboratory cleanrooms are typically used in research laboratories, testing centers, and similar facilities for various experiments, tests, and analysis activities. Their main function is to provide a clean and stable air environment for experiments, ensuring the accuracy and reliability of experimental results.

 

Medical Type:

Medical cleanrooms are mainly used in hospital operating rooms, sterile rooms, and clean wards for surgeries, treatments, and patient care. Their main function is to provide a clean and sterile air environment for medical activities, preventing cross-infection and disease transmission.

 

Storage Type:

These cleanrooms are usually used for storing items that require high cleanliness, such as pharmaceuticals, food, and precision instruments. Their main function is to provide a clean and dust-free environment for storing items, preventing contamination and damage.

 

Special Purpose:

These cleanrooms are designed for specific needs and applications, including aerospace cleanrooms, biosafety laboratories, semiconductor manufacturing cleanrooms, etc. Their function and design vary according to specific requirements and applications.

 

Classification by Airflow Design:

Horizontal Flow:

Vertical and Horizontal

In horizontal flow cleanrooms, air enters the room from one side and then flows horizontally across the room, ultimately exiting from the opposite side. This airflow pattern is suitable for larger rooms and is commonly used in general industrial production and laboratory environments.

Vertical Flow:

In vertical flow cleanrooms, air enters the room from the top and then flows vertically downward, ultimately exiting from the bottom exhaust vents. This airflow pattern effectively controls particles in the air and is suitable for environments with higher cleanliness requirements, such as medical operating rooms and biological laboratories.

 

Mixed Flow:

Mixed flow cleanrooms combine characteristics of both horizontal and vertical flows. Air enters the room from the side and partially from the top, then mixes and flows throughout the room, ultimately exiting from the bottom. This airflow pattern provides a more uniform distribution of clean air and is suitable for general industrial production and laboratory environments.

 

Recirculating Flow:

In recirculating flow cleanrooms, air circulates within the room, continuously filtered and purified by the air circulation system without the need for external intake. This airflow pattern is suitable for special environments, such as biosafety laboratories and specialized manufacturing environments.

 

Classification by Air Handling Equipment:

FFU Cleanrooms:

FFU (Fan Filter Unit) is an air handling device that integrates a fan and filter, typically installed on the ceiling or wall of a cleanroom. FFU cleanrooms provide clean air through multiple FFU units and can adjust air flow and pressure differentials as needed.

FFU Cleanrooms

 

AHU Cleanrooms:

AHU (Air Handling Unit) is an air handling device that includes various air processing components, such as filters, heaters, coolers, humidifiers, fans, etc. AHU cleanrooms use centralized air handling equipment to process and distribute clean air to the interior of the room.

 

Traditional HVAC Cleanrooms:

Traditional HVAC cleanrooms typically use conventional central air conditioning systems, including air conditioning units, ducts, and air supply terminals, to process and distribute clean air.

 

Centralized Air Purification:

This type of cleanroom utilizes a centralized air purification system, including air purifiers, air handling units, air supply outlets, etc., to centrally process and distribute clean air.

 

Localized Purification:

Localized purification equipment is typically installed in specific work areas or equipment to locally remove particles or pollutants from the air, such as localized vacuum cleaners, local exhaust hoods, etc.

 

Conclusion:

There are various types of cleanrooms available, allowing you to choose and design the most suitable one based on different scenario needs, application fields, space sizes, etc., to meet the corresponding air quality requirements.

 

FAQ

 

How can I accurately determine the cleanliness level of a cleanroom?

You can use professional instruments to measure the concentration of particles in the air, refer to the ISO 14644 standard, and make judgments. Alternatively, you can hire a professional team for assessment.

 

How can I estimate the construction and operational costs of a cleanroom?

How can I estimate the construction and operational costs of a cleanroom

Construction and operational costs depend on various factors, including the size, type, level, air handling equipment, material selection, and management team. Assess and calculate based on specific circumstances.

 

How can I ensure that the constructed cleanroom meets relevant requirements?

During design and construction, consider various factors, choose suitable materials and equipment. After construction, arrange for an evaluation and acceptance team to conduct testing and acceptance on-site to ensure that the cleanroom meets requirements.

 

What should I pay attention to in maintaining a cleanroom?

Regularly inspect, clean, and replace air filters. Timely repair any malfunctioning air handling equipment. Also, pay attention to daily cleaning and maintenance of the walls and floors inside the cleanroom.

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